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Great Wicca Books for Beginners


1. The Wicca Handbook, by Eileen Holland - Eileen Holland is a brillant writer. She has a knack for giving lots of information, in an easy to understand way. The book is broken into three sections: Becoming A Witch, The Craft, and Correspondences. Becoming A Witch describes the basics of Wicca, including ethics, casting spells, and writing spells. The section of The Craft describes many sections of spellcrafts (such as feritlity, love, wealth) broken down into information, spells, and correspondences. relating. The third section Correspondences, includes letters, numbers, the cardinal points, gemstones, and more. If you enjoy this book, I'd suggest other books by Holland, especially A Witch's Book of Answers, which is also very good for beginners. It supplies lots of answers to the typical questions you may have, as the questions come from readers of her website. I would reccommend it, as it teaches a lot, and is bound to answer a lot of your questions.
2. True Magic, by Amber K. - Amber K. is one of the best Wiccan authors I have come across. While it is written for beginners, I believe it is a book that should be in every Pagan's collection. It is a very useful book, teaching things in much simpler ways than I had learned them for, including exercises to further broaden the worth of the book. She includes new techniques and exercises, used by students at her own nonprofit school, If only allowed to keep books by one pagan author, I'd keep Amber K. She has a refreshing manner of looking at things, and explaining them. She discusses energy, magic and health, creating the magic "you", working with nature, and much much more. I found it pleasing as well, that she lists more books to refer to on every section, if you wish to learn more about that specific section. Many of the books she recommends are ones that you might have to order, but chances are, without her mentioning the book, you wouldn't hear of such great references otherwise. I have reread this book a few times, and am currently rereading it again, and it is amazing to find out how much you discover each time with each read through, and each time doing the exercises.

3. Pop Goes The Witch, by Fiona Horne - I didn't expect to truly enjoy this book as much as I did. Fiona Horne only wrote the narration of this (foreword, a few articles, and the conclusion), but she picked amazing witches to write sections of the book, such as Raymond Buckland, Jannet Farrar, and Christopher Penczak. This is especially good as a chance to read information from various famous witches, specializing in many different forms of magic. You can learn more about these kinds, and then decide whether to read more about the topic, or decide whether to read more by that author. The book touches on things such as what magic is not, media representations of magic, different kind of spells, etc. Something that both this book, and the forementioned True Magic mention is what Fiona calls "Integrating the Magick of Body and Soul." This is something not mentioned often, but involves keeping yourself healthy physically, emotionally, and mentally. Without this, you cannot be grounded, and centered, and your magic may not work as successfully. She also included wonderful references.

4. Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, by Scott Cunningham - This is Scott Cunningham's introduction to Wicca. It is very suitable for beginners, but most witches can find them using this (or any other Cunningham book) as a reference. It does included portions of his own Book of Shadows, after teaching what you need to know to write your own. It is designed for a solitary witch, but most which is good, as it assumed you have little or none prior knowledge. It also gets in depth on attuning with nature, and how this part of Wicca, something often overlooked.

5. The Inner Temple Of Witchcraft: Magick, Meditation, and Psychic Development, by Christopher Penczak - I recently discovered this, but I wish I t had been written when I was first getting started. Regardless, I have found it very useful even now. I would suggest getting the accompaning cd, to assist with the guided meditations. It is very useful for energy work, mediation, and different healing practices. It shouldn't be your first book, but it goes very well to assist in very these very important techniques. There are thirteen levels, taking you to the equivalent of a first-degree, and the lessons can be followed in the traditional manner of a year and a day. I have found this book very useful, and will be buying the more advanced Outer Temple.

6. Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft - This is the book most commonly recommended by witches I know. It is an excellent reference, for Wiccans of any advancements. It is traditional, so I would not recommend it as your only book, or first book, as some things that he prefers is purely optional for witches, and there are other ways to do it. I would suggest buying this after reading three or four other books, but definitely keeping it around as a reference. With studying of this text, one can learn what would make you a third-degree Gardnerian. It is usually refered to as a self study course, as besides the teachngs, it includes quizzes, and exercises.